Swimming Pool and Spa Wiring Methods

Outdoor Swimming Pool and Spa Wiring Methods
1. Use Table E4202.1 to identify acceptable wiring methods for new outdoor swimming pools and outdoor spas and hot tubs. Refer to the IRC for acceptable wiring methods for indoor swimming pools and spas and hot tubs. Note that some wiring methods not listed in this table are approved under certain conditions for swimming pools, spas, and hot tubs built under prior codes.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          2. Include an insulated equipment grounding wire with feeder wires between the pool equipment subpanel and the source of power for the subpanel. (E4205).
3. Use brass or other approved corrosion-resistant metal conduit. Do not use aluminum conduit in the pool area where it may be subject to corrosion.

Flexible Cord Uses and Limitations Near Swimming Pools and Spas
1. You may use a fl exible cord to serve fi xed or stationary swimming pool equipment if all of the following apply:
(a) the flexible cord is not more than (≤) 3 feet long, and if
(b) the flexible cord has a copper grounding wire at least (≥) #12 AWG, and if
(c) the circuit does not serve an underwater light, and if
(d) the plug has a grounding prong.
The 3 feet flexible cord length limitation does not apply to temporary swimming pools.                                                                                                                                                                                       2. Apply the restrictions in #1 to all fl exible cord equipped lights on or near the pool deck that are located within (≤) 16 feet from any point on the water surface. This would include common table and stand lamps.
3. You may use a flexible cord between a listed underwater light and a junction box or other enclosure if there are no splices in the flexible cord and if the flexible cord has an insulated copper grounding wire that is: (a) contained within the fl exible cord, and (b) at least (≥) as large as the supply wires at the enclosure where the fl exible cord connects to the power supply wires, and (c) at least (≥) #16 AWG, and (d) connected to the grounding terminal at the enclosure where the flexible cord connects to the power supply wires. In most cases this means that the flexible cord insulated grounding wire should be at least #14 AWG because the supply wires to most junction boxes will be at least #14 AWG.
4. You may use a flexible cord to serve an outdoor packaged spa or hot tub if the circuit is GFCI protected and if the flexible cord is not longer than (≤) 15 feet.
5. You may use a flexible cord to serve an indoor packaged spa or hot tub if the circuit is rated not more than (≤) 20 amps.
6. Connect the flexible cord equipment grounding wire to a fi xed-in-place part of fixed or stationary equipment. Bond or mount the removable part of the equipment to the grounded fixed-inplace part of the equipment.