ELECTRICAL SYSTEM GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

Electrial Equipment Access and Clearances

Clearances Around Electrical Panel Enclosures and Energized Equipment
1. Provide a clear working space in front of electrical panel cabinets and other equipment and enclosures that require access while interior parts are energized. Examples of other enclosures include air conditioner and furnace service disconnect boxes.
2. Make the clear working space at least (≥) 36 inches deep, and at least (≥) 30 inches wide (or as wide as the enclosure if it is wider than 30 inches), and at least (≥) 78 inches high (or as high as the enclosure if it is higher than 78 inches). Measure the clear working space from any exposed energized parts or from the cover in front of covered energized parts.
3. You may install service equipment and panelboards rated not more than (≤) 200 amps in existing buildings where the working space height is less than (<) 78 inches.
4. Provide enough clearance so that the enclosure door can be opened at least (≥) 90 degrees.
5. Do not allow any objects located above or below the electrical enclosures to extend into the clear working space more than (>) 6 inches beyond the front of the electrical enclosure.
6. Provide access to the clear working space. Do not block access with shelves, workbenches, or other difficult to move objects. Read the full Topic

Electrical Equipment Access and Clearances

Clearances Around Electrical Panel Enclosures and Energized Equipment
1. Provide a clear working space in front of electrical panel cabinets and other equipment and enclosures that require access while interior parts are energized. Examples of other enclosures include air conditioner and furnace service disconnect boxes.
2. Make the clear working space at least (≥) 36 inches deep, and at least (≥) 30 inches wide (or as wide as the enclosure if it is wider than 30 inches), and at least (≥) 78 inches high (or as high as the enclosure if it is higher than 78 inches). Measure the clear working space from any exposed energized parts or from the cover in front of covered energized parts.
3. You may install service equipment and panelboards rated not more than (≤) 200 amps in existing buildings where the working space height is less than (<) 78 inches.
4. Provide enough clearance so that the enclosure door can be opened at least (≥) 90 degrees.
5. Do not allow any objects located above or below the electrical enclosures to extend into the clear working space more than (>) 6 inches beyond the front of the electrical enclosure.
6. Provide access to the clear working space. Do not block access with shelves, workbenches, or other difficult to move objects.

Read the full Topic

Electrical System General Installation Requirements

Electrical Systems Governed by the IRC
1. The IRC governs 120/240 volt, 0 to 400 ampere, single-phase residential electrical systems including wiring, equipment, appliances, and other devices involved in supplying, distributing, and using electricity in a home.
2. Electrical chapters of the IRC are a modifi ed version of parts of the National Electrical Code ® (NEC ®) published and copyrighted by the National Fire Protection Association.
3. Electrical systems and components not governed by the IRC are usually addressed by the version of the NEC adopted by the local jurisdiction.
4. The IRC does not govern the electrical transmission and communication systems controlled by utilities. This often includes electrical service wires and equipment up to and including the electric meter and often includes cable TV and telephone wires up and including the utility interface boxes.
5. The IRC does not govern internal wiring of electrical appliances such as motors; however, it usually requires that electrical appliances be listed. Read the full Topic

Electrical System General Installation Requirements

Electrical Systems Governed by the IRC
1. The IRC governs 120/240 volt, 0 to 400 ampere, single-phase residential electrical systems including wiring, equipment, appliances, and other devices involved in supplying, distributing, and using electricity in a home.
2. Electrical chapters of the IRC are a modifi ed version of parts of the National Electrical Code ® (NEC ®) published and copyrighted by the National Fire Protection Association.
3. Electrical systems and components not governed by the IRC are usually addressed by the version of the NEC adopted by the local jurisdiction.
4. The IRC does not govern the electrical transmission and communication systems controlled by utilities. This often includes electrical service wires and equipment up to and including the electric meter and often includes cable TV and telephone wires up and including the utility interface boxes.
5. The IRC does not govern internal wiring of electrical appliances such as motors; however, it usually requires that electrical appliances be listed. Read the full Topic

Wire Splices and General Installation Requirements

Wire Splices
1. Splice (join) wires using only listed devices such as appropriate size wire nuts. Use wire nuts according to manufacturer’s recommendations about the number and size of wires that the wire nut can accommodate.
2. Cover spliced wires with material equal to the original insulation. This does not include electrical tape or similar materials.
3. Splice wires that will be buried in the ground using only devices listed for direct burial and install them according to manufacturer’s instructions.
4. Provide access to spliced wires, unless the splice and splicing device are specifi cally allowed to be concealed. Access is usually provided by an accessible, covered junction box.
5. Do not place wire splices in a raceway unless the raceway has a removable cover. Read the full Topic

Wire Splices and General Wire Installation Requirements

Wire Splices
1. Splice (join) wires using only listed devices such as appropriate size wire nuts. Use wire nuts according to manufacturer’s recommendations about the number and size of wires that the wire nut can accommodate.
2. Cover spliced wires with material equal to the original insulation. This does not include electrical tape or similar materials.
3. Splice wires that will be buried in the ground using only devices listed for direct burial and install them according to manufacturer’s instructions.
4. Provide access to spliced wires, unless the splice and splicing device are specifi cally allowed to be concealed. Access is usually provided by an accessible, covered junction box.
5. Do not place wire splices in a raceway unless the raceway has a removable cover. Read the full Topic