WALL CONSTRUCTION

Cripple Walls

Cripple Wall Definition Read the full Topic

Glass Block Walls

Glass Block Size

1. Use standard size hollow or standard size solid glass blocks that are at least () 3 inches thick. Read the full Topic

Headers

1. Refer to Section R502.5 in this book for information about allowed header spans in exterior and interior load-bearing walls. Read the full Topic

Masonry Walls Above Grade

Limitations of the Material in this Section

These IRC sections present requirements for building above-grade walls using several types of masonry units. These sections also present requirements for anchoring joists and rafters to masonry walls. You may build masonry walls using single wythe (layer) or multiple wythe masonry units. Note that these IRC sections do not apply to basement, crawl space, or other foundation walls. The most common masonry unit for building residential walls is the concrete masonry unit (CMU), also known as a concrete block or cinder block. Read the full Topic

Sile, Sole, and Top Plates

Top Plate Construction

1. Use at least () two 2 inch (nominal) depth top plates that are at least () as wide as the studs at the top of load-bearing walls. Example: use two 2×4 top plates on top of a 2×4 wall. 2. Off set joints where two pieces of top plate meet by at least () 24 inches. You do not need to place a stud under a joint in a top plate unless the stud would be placed there for other reasons. Read the full Topic

Wall Bracing

Limitations of the Material in this Section

The IRC presents many methods and complex rules for wall bracing. Wall bracing is best left to qualified engineers and architects. This section discusses a few common wall bracing methods and some general rules about how to install them. Read the full Topic

Wall Height and Stud Spacing

 Limitations of the Material in this Section

The IRC presents many combinations of wall heights, lumber sizes, and spacing. The discussion in this book section includes wall heights and stud spacing commonly used in new construction. Refer to the IRC for more information about other wall height and stud spacing combinations. Refer to the IRC for wall height and stud spacing requirements in high wind, heavy snow load, and seismic design areas. Read the full Topic

Wood Nailing Schedule

Limitations of the Material in this Section

The IRC describes many combinations of materials and fasteners used to attach wood structural members to other wood structural members. The discussion in this book section is limited to using nails to attach materials commonly used in new construction. Refer to the IRC for more information about other materials and fasteners. Read the full Topic

Wood Stud and Plate Boring Notching

Boring and Notching Definitions

Bore: A bore is a hole drilled in a stud or joist. Use the actual dimensions to determine the depth of framing lumber and when calculating the maximum hole diameter. Read the full Topic