C Definitions

Definition Categories

Cable

A cable is two or more wires contained in an insulating sheath or jacket. Most “wire” used in residential construction is actually a cable called non-metallic cable and abbreviated NM.

Carport

A carport is a space for parking motor vehicles that is open to the outdoors on at least (≥) two sides. Garages and carports may be att ached to or detached from the dwelling. Garage fire separation requirements do not apply to carports. See garage.

Category I gas appliance

A Category I gas appliance expels combustion products into a vent under negative static pressure and with a (higher) vent gas temperature that does not produce excessive moisture condensation in the vent. Most residential water heaters and furnaces are Category I appliances. Category I appliances can be either draft hood equipped (most water heaters) or fan-assisted appliances (most newer furnaces). The fan in a fan-assisted Category I appliance assists movement the combustion products within the heat exchanger of the furnace. The fan does not place the vent under positive static pressure.

Category II gas appliance

A Category II gas appliance expels combustion products into a vent under negative static pressure and with a (lower) vent gas temperature that can produce excessive moisture condensation in the vent. At this time, the author knows of no available Category II appliances.

Category III gas appliance

A Category III gas appliance expels combustion products into a vent under positive static pressure and with a (higher) vent gas temperature that does not produce excessive moisture condensation in the vent. Some mid-efficiency, sidewall vented residential furnaces and water heaters fall into this category.

Category IV gas appliance

A Category IV gas appliance expels combustion products into a vent under positive static pressure and with a (lower) vent gas temperature that can produce excessive moisture condensation in the vent. This category includes high efficiency, condensing residential furnaces and boilers.

Chimney

A chimney is a generally vertical, non-combustible structure that contains at least one flue and exhausts combustion products to the outdoors. A chimney may be constructed using masonry or it may be a factory-built system using a metal flue. Chimneys are often built to serve solid-fuel-burning fireplaces, but they may serve as vents for other fuel-burning devices such as gas or oil-burning appliances. A properly sized chimney may serve as a vent for gas and oil-burning appliances, but chimneys and vents are constructed differently. The rules that apply to chimneys do not always apply to vents. Refer to Chapter 18 for oil-burning appliance vents and to Chapter 24 for gas-burning appliance vents.

Closet bend

A closet bend is a fitting used to connect a closet flange to other plumbing pipes. Closet bends often reduce the pipe size from the 4 inches of the closet flange to 3 inches.

Closet flange

A closet flange is the fitting upon which a toilet (water closet) sits. Many different closet flanges are available to accommodate different fitting and pipe configurations. One type of loset flange allows you to off set the closet flange around a floor joist.

 

Closet Storage Area

A space intended for storage of clothing.  A clothes closet usually contains a horizontal rod for hanging clothing. This definition implies that this section does not apply to storage areas such as linen closets and pantries. As with all codes, application of this section depends on interpretation by the local building official.

Clothes Closet

A clothes closet is an enclosed space designed for storage of clothing. A rod or other means for hanging clothing is the common defining feature of a clothes closet. Shelving, by itself, does not usually make a closet a clothes closet. Limits on clothes closets in the electrical chapters usually do not apply to spaces such as linen closets and pantries.

Combustible materials

Include wood, drywall (the drywall paper is combustible), some roof covering materials, and insulation.

Common vent

A common vent is a vent connected to two or more gas appliances located on the same level or floor. A common vent begins at the bottom of the fitting where the highest connecting gas appliance connects to the common vent. You may connect multiple Category I (negative vent pressure) fan-assisted and/or draft hood appliances to a common vent. You may not connect Category I gas appliances and Category III and IV (positive vent pressure) gas appliances to the same common vent.

Common vent off set

A common vent off set is any part of a common vent that runs in a direction other than vertical.

Conditioned space

Conditioned space is any room or area that is heated or cooled or that has an opening into an area that is heated or cooled.

Conductor

A conductor, broadly defined, is any material that provides low resistance to the flow of electricity. Conductor is the preferred technical term for electrical wire. Conductors in a residential electrical system include: ungrounded (hot), grounded (neutral), grounding (equipment grounding), grounding electrode, service entrance, and feeders.

Connector length

Connector length is the total horizontal length of a vent connector in a common vent system measured from the center of the vent connector at the draft hood or flue collar to the center of the vent where the connector connects with the vent. Connector rise Connector rise is the total vertical height of a vent connector in a common vent system measured from the appliance flue collar or draft hood outlet to the center of the fitting where the vent gas streams join.

Coping

Coping is a cap on top of a wall, chimney, or similar exterior structure that protects the structure from water. Coping is usually sloped to drain water.

Coupling

A coupling is a fitting used to join two lengths of pipe in a straight line. It has two female openings, one on each end.